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Island View housecalming, tasteful bedrooms
Island View House
Island View House
10 gości
4 sypialnie
7 Łóżek
3 łazienki
10 gości
4 sypialnie
7 Łóżek
3 łazienki
Płatność nie zostanie jeszcze naliczona

Beautiful large house near Belmullet, Mayo. 4 spacious bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, fantastic dining kitchen, lounge with wood burner, incredible panoramic sea and mountain views. 7 minute drive to Belmullet town, 10 minute walk to gorgeous Shraigh beach.

Przestrzeń

Unique, individually designed 4 bedroomed detached house (sleeps 10) with truly unrivalled panoramic views of the sea and mountains. Wooden floors, solid fuel stove, every modern appliance, fantastic kitchen with belfast sink and sea views, incredible conservatory with vaulted ceiling and full length chapel windows to make the most of the view, cosy yet elegant living room, master bedroom en suite, plus 2 separate bathrooms.
To get a real taste of Ireland, with its turf fires, traditional music, great Guinness, fantastic scenery and a warm Irish welcome, make sure you head to Belmullet, Co Mayo, it's the best in the West!

Dostęp gości

Shraigh beach is a 2 minute drive or 10-15 minute stroll away and you will often have the whole of this glorious beach to yourself, with its crystal clear waters and beautiful white sands. Carne Golf Club is 8 miles from the property and the nearest airport is Knock airport. The house is also fully equipped for anyone who has young children, i.e. cot, buggy, high chair and a selection of children's toys.

Kontakt z gośćmi

The owner's Mum and Dad live just a short drive away and so you have all the space and privacy you might need, but equally we are on hand to help with anything you need. They also provide a lovely welcome pack to get your holiday off to the best possible start!

Inne ważne rzeczy

The Mullet peninsula is an area of unspoiled natural beauty and mystique, which is becoming a very popular tourist location. Its latest attraction is an 18-hole championship links golf course at Carne, west of Belmullet. The peninsula is about 33 km in length and 12 km wide at the widest points, narrowing to about 400 metres in the region of Elly Bay. The trip from Belmullet to Blacksod Point (21 km) gives a good understanding of the nature of the peninsula: its west coast, exposed to the Atlantic, is wild and beautiful, while the east overlooks the inlet of Blacksod Bay. Along the way there is Binghamstown, Elly Bay, with its beautiful beaches, and Aghleam (Eachleim), a popular place for Irish language courses. The ruins of the successor of St. Deirbhile's 6th century church with its Romanesque west doorway, her possible grave, and some early cross-pillars can be seen at Falmore (Fál Mór) on the south-west end of the peninsula.
To the south-east, there is a splendid view of the cliffs of Achill. Offshore, the uninhabited islands of Duvillaun More, Inishkea North and South (St. Columcille) and Inishglora (St Brendan, the Navigator) contain some very interesting remains of early ecclesiastical settlements including a number of finely incised cross slabs. Inishglora is associated with a celebrated fable in Irish mythology, 'The Children of Lir' (where a group of children were turned into swans and wandered the country for 900 years). the ruin of Cross Abbey, a small medieval church the foundation of which is attributed to St. Brendan, the Navigator, in the 6th century, can be seen west of Binghamstown. There is also an interesting early ecclesiastical site at Kilmore. The northern coastline contains the remains of a number of promontory forts. The Mullet peninsula is a popular location for sea-angling. It is also renowned for its unique bird-life, some of which deserve special mention. Termoncarragh Lough, now under the protection of the Irish Wildlife Conservancy, is home to the Red Necked Phalarope (admission to the reserve is by appointment only - for watchers that is, not birds..!).
The islands of Inishkea are well-known bird sanctuaries. They provide habitats for a large colony of Barnacle Geese (winter visitors to Ireland), and Inishglora is home to a big colony of Storm Petrels. The Mullet peninsula is a Gaeltacht area with a rich heritage of traditional music, song and dance.
The North West Ireland region

The Mullet peninsula is an area of unspoiled natural beauty and mystique, which is becoming a very popular tourist location. Its latest attraction is an 18-hole championship links golf course at Carn, west of Belmullet. The peninsula is about 33 km in length and 12 km wide at the widest points, narrowing to about 400 metres in the region of Elly Bay.

The trip from Belmullet to Blackpool point (21 km) gives a good understanding of the nature of the peninsula: its west coast, exposed to the Atlantic, is completely denuded of vegetation, while the east overlooks the inlet of Blacksod Bay. Along the way there is Binghamstown, Elly Bay, with its beautiful beaches, and Aghleam (Eachleim), a popular place for Irish language courses. The ruins of the successor of St. Deirbhile's 6th century church with its Romanesque west doorway, her possible grave, and some early cross-pillars can be seen at Fallmore on the south-west end of the peninsula. To the south-east, there is a splendid view of the cliffs of Achill. Offshore, the uninhabited islands of Duvillaun More, Inishkea North and South (St. Columcille) and Inishglora (St Brendan, the Navigator) contain some very interesting remains of early ecclesiastical settlements including a number of finely incised cross slabs.

Inishglora is associated with a celebrated fable in Irish mythology, 'The Children of Lir' (where a group of children were turned into swans and wandered the country for 900 years). the ruin of Cross 'Abbey', a small medieval church the foundation of which is attributed to St. Brendan, the Navigator, in the 6th century, can be seen west of Binghamstown. There is also an interesting early ecclesiastical site at Kilmore. The northern coastline contains the remains of a number of promontory forts. The Mullet peninsula is a popular location for sea-angling. It is also renowned for its unique bird-life, some of which deserve special mention. Termoncarragh Lough, now under the protection of the Irish Wildlife Conservancy, is home to the Red Necked Phalarope (admission to the reserve is by appointment only).

The islands of Inishkea are well-known bird sanctuaries. They provide habitats for a large colony of Barnacle Geese (winter visitors to Ireland), and Inishglora is home to a big colony of Storm Petrels. The Mullet peninsula is a Gaeltacht area with a rich heritage of traditional music, song and dance.

Belmullet

BELMULLET TOWN

Belmullet town, about 1200 people, was laid out around 1820. It is unusual in having two major bays in Blacksod Bay and Broadhaven Bay heading up at each end of the main street and connected by a canal running through the town. The town serves the commercial and administration functions of the Erris region and is the centre for shopping and recreation for a hinterland population of some 12,000 people. It is well served with shops, banks, bakery, cafes, hotel and guest houses, hospital, garages, cinema, dance-hall, community centre, airstrip, hairdressers, swimming pool and twenty public houses.

MULLET PENINSULA

26 km by 16 km from Blacksod point on the south to Erris head in the north, it offers miles of secluded beaches and coves. It has many and varied archaeological sites. At Annagh Head there are gneisses which are some 2000 million years old, the oldest yet recorded in Ireland. The similarity of the rock type and structure to that of the eastern seaboard of North America, Newfoundland and Greenland, leads to the conclusion that they were once joined, torn apart when the Atlantic opened up 200 million years ago. It is also a well known area for many rare birds especially on the islands of lnniskea and Innisglora.

At least two Spanish Armada ships sailed into Blacksod Bay - the 'La Rata Sancta Maria Encoronada' and the 'Duquesa Santa Ana'; the 'Santiago' foundered in Broad Haven. At the summit of Glosh Hill stands a signal tower, built by the British during the Napoleonic Wars early in the nineteenth century to protect the coast from attack. There is one position in Erris where it is said that you can see four lighthouses. Eagle Island, which was first lit in 1835 is situated off Doonamo Head where the rock scenery is beautiful in this vicinity and worth a visit if you are in the mood for a walk. At the southern tip of the peninsula is a beautifully built of cut granite lighthouse at Blacksod. It was built in 1864 by Bryan Carey of Belmullet and now also contains a helicopter port to service this coast. Twelve miles out to sea is Blackrock lighthouse built in 1864 which was a very lonely place for the light-keepers especially in olden times. Finally in the northern mouth of Broadhaven bay stands Ballyglass lighthouse which guides the boats into this bay leading to Belmullet. Those lighthouses show the maritime importance of this coastline in earlier times.

EACHLÉIM (AGHLEAM)

From the gaelic Each (horse) and Léim (jump), folklore has it that a horse leapt from the western end of the townland to the east, and the land between was thus named. Ten miles south west of Belmullet, close to the unspoilt beaches of Mullagh Rua and Elly, this vibrant Gaeltacht area is steeped in tradition and culture. The Ionad Deirbhile - Eachléim Heritage Centre - gives a friendly and informative glimpse at life here in times past. Named in honour of the sixth century St Deirbhile, according to tradition she rests at nearby Fál Mór, and water from her well is said to have curative properties for eye complaints. Custom also has it that if you can pass three times through the small east window of her Chapel, heaven is your reward; another says that passing seven times means you will not die by drowning.

Ionad Deirbhile, Eachléim (Aughleam)

THE ISLANDS

Off the coast to the west lie the beautiful islands of Inis Glora, Inishkea North and South, and Dubh Oiléan Mór, on all of which monasteries flourished in Early Christian times. St Brendan the Navigator (who sailed the Atlantic in a leather boat) had links with Inis Glora, as did the fabled four Children of Lir, doomed to wander the waters of Ireland for 900 years as enchanted singing swans, spending their last 300 here before regaining human form and withering to dust.

The Inishkeas had a thriving fishing community until disaster struck on 28th October 1927, when ten fishermen were lost at sea. There were two survivors, and the Islands were abandoned shortly after. St Colmcille founded a monastery on Inishkea North. A whaling station was set up by the Norwegians in 1907 on Rusheen, a tidal island east of Inishkea South, and the remains are still evident today. The Inishkeas are internationally important with respect to birdlife - half of the Irish wintering population of Barnacle geese make these islands their home.

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THE MAINLAND

GLENCASTLE

This, being the ancestral homeland, has its own page. Select it on the left.

BANGOR / BELLACORICK

On the way from Ballina or Castlebar the most notable building on the journey is the ESB power station at Bellacorick. This is a major industry in the area combining the product of west bogland by Bord na Mona to produce electricity. This is indeed an indigenous industry in every way. Further on is the village of Bangor Erris, set amongst the foothills of Nephin Beg mountain and the valley of Owenmore river, which is very well known for its salmon fishing.

GEESALA / DOOHOMA

Branching off to the left, west of Bangor, is the road to the village of Geesala. A modern hotel built as the 'Ostan Synge', now the 'Teach Iorrais' is prominent on the right. Further on around the southern coastline is Doohoma village with fine guest houses and modern lounge bars. This area was the basis for the world famous 'Playboy of the Western World' by J M Synge.

CARROWTEIGE / PORTURLIN / GLENAMOY

A vast area of virgin bog is situated north west of Glenamoy with a beautiful and interesting coastline. Porturlin, a small fishing village with a very active fishing fleet, is situated here. The cliff scenery viewed from the seaward side is fantastic, 'lit by a slanting sun' in the summer evenings. A thickly populated coastline stretches around Carrowteige and which is also a genuinely Irish speaking area.

INVER / PULLATHOMAS

Turning north at Barnatra the road leads around a coastline which could be said to be the finest in this area. Through Inver the road climbs higher overlooking Broadhaven Bay and overshadowed by the mountain of Glengad. This rough coastline facing the Atlantic was the holiday home for the Children of Lir for 300 years according to the legend.

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What to Do!

WATERSPORTS

For the Watersport enthusiast or a traditional family picnic on the beach, Erris offers superb locations. The two main bays, Blacksod and Broad-Haven have miles of golden sand and gentle sheltered waters while at the more exposed Annagh Beach there is an excellent surf.

The area is renowned for Scuba Diving, Kitesurfing, Windsurfing, Sailing, Canoeing and there are many safe beaches for children. Swimming, Windsurfing and Canoeing tuition is available in season, and boat trips to the islands off the coast are available on request, weather permitting..

GOLF LINKS

Possibly the most challenging 18 hole championship links golf course in Ireland, Carne is open to non-members, and visitors are most welcome. This unique course offers the unexpected twist - tactics change from the sheltered hollows to the hills and slopes, and all with a magnificent backdrop of sea, sky and mountains.

There is a 9 hole golf course at Binghamstown on the Peninsula, and a fine 9 hole pitch and putt course at Belmullet.

Carne at West Coast Links / Golflink, and Belmullet Golf Club

SEA ANGLING

Belmullet has taken its place among the leading names in sea angling centres in Europe. The Belmullet Sea Angling Club was founded in 1964, its objective - to promote sea angling as a sport for sea anglers and to provide an information service. The results were most rewarding and it is now known that almost any species of sea fish known to inhabit the waters around the British Isles can be caught at Belmullet. Thirty five varieties were caught in 1984. A major fishing festival is held here every year in the middle of August.

SHORE FISHING

Shore fishing is particularly good all round the area, both on the Atlantic coast and inner coastline of Blacksod and Broadhaven Bays. There are some recognised spots from which large catches have been taken, while there are more inviting and interesting places which have not yet been fished.

FRESH WATER ANGLING

Carrowmore Lake, the Owenmore, the Owenduff, the Munhin and the Glenamoy rivers are well known salmon and trout fishing rivers. Licences and ghillies can be got by arrangement from local hotels and guest houses.

BIRD WATCHING

The beaches and coastline of Erris are home to a variety of bird species throughout the year, making the Barony of Erris especially interesting for birdwatchers. Cormorants and a wide variety of Gulls are some of the more common birds to be seen.Several varieties of shearwaters, petrels, skuas, gulls, terns as well as puffins, choughs, gannets and kittiwakes can be found in the coastal areas. Inland you may well see a peregrine falcon, a merlin or even hear the elusive corncrake.

Breaking News..15th November 2010 - American Coot spotted on the Mullet, plus American Buff-Bellied Pipits, see:

(URL HIDDEN)

CÉIDE FIELDS - Achaidh Chéide

The Céide Fields Interpretative Centre illustrates one of the oldest structured farming communities in the World. This excavated site offers a chance to appreciate the life of Europe's early ancestors. The finds were preserved under bog for 5,000 years and are renowned throughout the archaeological world as the finest and earliest of their kind.

Ceide Fields - Fianna / Ceide / UCDublin

TÍR SÁILE - North Mayo Sculpture Trail

This land is riddled with the marks of mans' passage through 5000 years of settlement - so many that an old tomb, a dolmen, will be destroyed for a new road; a farmer quietly removes uncovered ruins to gain more 'useful' land. And yet to celebrate Mayo 5000 in 1993, from Ballina through Ballycastle to Fallmore, fifteen contemporary sculptures were created by artists from Denmark, Japan, Great Britain, the USA and Ireland (modestly, built to last another 5000 years). Many question why they took such great lengths to imitate the monumental efforts of the past - following the footsteps of the gods - but as my mother says 'a man can move a mountain today, and tomorrow it will be back'. It could have been a supermarket or a fast-food chain, to record how our society is progressing. These modern 'follies' do however provide an excuse to travel miles of rugged coastline, covering areas of unspoilt beauty, breath-taking scenery along some of the remotest areas of the coastal strip of North West Mayo.

Tír Sáile

WALKING

The quiet beaches on both sides of the peninsula are ideal for walking at low tide (consult tide time-table beforehand) and for taking in the panoramic view. Slieve Mór and the Cruachán Cliffs of Achill are clearly visible to the south, and much of lowland Erris can be seen to the east.

This environment offers many contrasts of terrain. The walks at Belderrig Cliffs rise 1,002 feet from the sea and follow the coastline for miles. The challenge of the natural structure of these cliffs for abseiling and mountaineering must be confronted. They also provide a natural habitat for many marine mammals and sea birds.

The Bangor Trail, the original road to Castlebar, is a spectacular walk and passable all year round. The unique undisturbed boglands, largest in Europe, the hills and slopes of rural farming communities and the many secluded coastal trails enchant the visitor. With noted equestrian facilities and many pony trekking trails in the area, this natural landscape seems all the more beautiful when viewed from the back of a mount. The real joy of exploring Erris is the solitude and sense of oneness with an undisturbed environment.

The BLANKET BOG

This living, breathing, unspoilt bogland is the largest in Europe and teeming with, wildlife and flora. The stillness and peace here is disturbed only by the sound of the Corncrake. Many species of wildfowl stop here on their migration from the Arctic, Canada and Greenland. Flora is abundant and there are varieties found here originating in the Arctic, South West Europe and North America.

TOURING

Erris is on a number of Tour Operators' itineraries - but if you've read this far, you will already have the impression that the best way is to walk the road and see what's around the next bend. There is far too much, and if you take a tour, you will leave with the yearning to come back and see more.

GoIreland / VIP Guide / Irish Country Holidays,

HERITAGE

On entering the area from the east you pass over the musical bridge at Bellacorrick. Here, if you run a stone along the top of the bridge you make music as fellow travellers have done for almost 200 years. This is an ancient land where many fables and legends were written. Evidence of man's existence on this fossilised landscape dates back before 3,000 B.C. The land is dotted with Megalithic tombs from neolithic times, Iron Age cliff forts, sites of castles from the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries with the well documented arrival of the Spanish Armada off Blacksod Bay in 1588.

The remains of the children of Lir are buried at Inishglora. According to the famous Irish Legend these four children were transformed into sweet-singing swans, doomed to wander the waters of Ireland for 900 years, before arriving at their final resting place in Erris.

The vibrant community of Erris has nurtured many famous playwrights, poets and musicians. Riocard Bairéad, the poet who lived and wrote here, is commemorated annually at Éigse Riocard Bairéad. The Straw Boys, an aspect of cultural life unique to Erris, can be seen entertaining in traditional Irish style at Weddings and other important festive occasions bringing life and luck. Join in 'Féile Chlann Lir' in late July/early August, a must for street theatre, Currach Racing and the craic. The centuries old 'Lá an Logha' on the 15th of August marks the traditional return of family and friends from abroad to celebrate this very unique local festival. There are cottage crafts featuring Aran knits, lacemaking, jewellery from hand made gifts using natural materials from the immediate area.

Meet the people in everyday life, in the shops, on the beach, at their festivals or in the many pubs where spontaneous music sessions and lively conversation will warm the heart of any visitor. Accommodation in the area is varied. Choose from Hotels, Guesthouses, Town and Country Homes and Farmhouses. Self catering holiday homes are also available. Everywhere you visit or stay you will find the highest of standards and a warmth that will be with you long after your visit has ended.

Udogodnienia
Kuchnia
Przyjazne dla dzieci
Zwierzęta dozwolone
Internet bezprzewodowy (wifi)
Konfiguracja miejsc do spania
Sypialnia 1
1 podwójne łóżko
Sypialnia 2
1 podwójne łóżko
Sypialnia 3
2 pojedyncze łóżka
Sypialnia 4
1 podwójne łóżko
Wspólna przestrzeń
1 pojedyncze łóżko, 1 sofa, 1 łóżeczko dziecięce
Regulamin Domu
Zakaz palenia
Zakaz organizowania imprez
Zameldowanie o dowolnej godzinie po 15:00
Wyjazd przed 11:00
Anulowania

5 recenzje

Dokładność
Komunikacja
Czystość
Lokalizacja
Zameldowanie
Wartość
Paula - Profil Użytkownika
lipiec 2017
Beautiful family house with a scenic view, wonderful perks and a grand table for family dinners. All the comforts of home and then some. I highly recommend this lovely house for getting back to basics and enjoying life as it should be!

Anthony - Profil Użytkownika
czerwiec 2017
If it's a quiet family holiday you're looking for (weather permitting) we would recommend Paul's place, a spacious clean family home , it had everything we needed

Veronika - Profil Użytkownika
wrzesień 2016
Die Lage des Hauses mit Sicht auf Gleggan Island ist genial. Man hält es gut im Haus sus auch wenn das Wetter mal nicht zu Ausflügen einlädt. Die Nachbarschaft ist ruhig. Das Haus ist gemütlich und praktisch eingerichtet. Mary, Pauls Mutter ist sehr freundlich und lustig, sie hat uns herumgeführt und uns alles gezeigt. Da waren sogar frische Blumen und Torf zum Beheizen des kleinen Ofens. Pauls Vater war in kürzester Zeit zur Stelle, als uns das Gas ausgegangen ist. Das WLAN - für alle, die wie ich nicht ohne auskommen - ist sehr gut. Auch die Heizung ist super, das Haus bleibt auch warm, wenn es draussen stürmt - nicht selstverständlich in Irland! Alles in allem hatten wir einen sehr schönen Aufenthalt!

Christine - Profil Użytkownika
sierpień 2016
Comfortable place, and from this place you can find nice view with maximum 1 hour drive. We had a wonderful stay

Gail - Profil Użytkownika
lipiec 2016
Mary's friendly face greeted us on our arrival. She showed us around the house and told us how things functioned. This house was absolutely perfect for my daughter, son-in-law, our four-year-old grandson, and seven-year-old granddaughter who joined us for the first part of our 10-week trip to Ireland. The rooms are huge, the furniture is extremely comfortable, and the sunroom made up for many of the rainy days we had while we were there-which was unusual for the area. Another plus was the quietness to the rooms. My son-in-law and daughter wanted to sleep in late several days because of the stress from their jobs, and all we had to do was close the doors to the rooms downstairs if we were in them. Somehow the doors were able to block out almost all the noise. A huge plus, especially with two little ones! The view from the house was phenomenal. The beach was in walking distance and it was beautiful! A little too cold to go swimming, but we enjoyed the beauty and the children loved playing in the sand. The town was close by, so my husband and son-in-law were able to hit the pub, and we had A quick drive to the supermarket when we needed supplies. The kitchen was so wonderful that we only ate out two times, and the food in town and was very good. One day was extremely rainy, but we lucked out! They actually have an arcade/bowling alley in town. Although bowling wasn't at the top of our list when we went to Ireland, it ended up being a great time. When my granddaughter was getting ready to leave, she sobbed. She said, "GiGi, wouldn't it be great if we could all live here together in this house and live in Ireland? I don't want to go home." What better review could there be than that?!!

Leeds, Wielka BrytaniaZ nami od: marzec 2013
Paul - Profil Użytkownika
Wskaźnik aktywności: 100%
Czas odpowiedzi: w ciągu godziny

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